About Amerandus Research

Dr. Robert Bauchwitz founded Amerandus Research in 2011. Dr. Bauchwitz’s motivation in forming Amerandus Research (AmR) was to expand his academic research into the area of handling research misconduct, and to provide practical assistance to others who were involved in conducting scientific fraud investigations. These new goals grew out of his own extensive experiences with a well-known research misconduct case, as well as the increasing realization by the scientific community of the significant financial and social harm from such misconduct and fraud.

Amerandus Research trademarks were filed with the USPTO in July 2011 under classification IC 042 with a range of related goals, including 1) analysis of scientific research data for the purpose of detecting fraud, 2) providing technologic services to support the review and investigation of research replicatability and fraud, and 3) performing scientific research. 

Our research fraud investigation staff has included, in addition to Dr. Bauchwitz, an attorney, a paralegal, a network security expert with multiple SANS certifications, and several programmers. We also collaborate with a wide range of scientists, attorneys, and other experts. Since 2017 we have also begun to work with government agencies (including outside the United States) on experimental record audit. While much of what we do for others is by its nature confidential, we have produced some public articles, memoranda, and samples of actual documents that exemplify what we have done and our abilities. (See "White Papers and Sample Documents" in the menu above.)(1)

Some testimonials can be found here.

 

Update August 6, 2019: 

Amerandus Research will resume full operations on August 18, 2019, upon return of the principal from a medical leave of absence.

Project work will continue to be available through the secure portal at https://healthsci.org.

Consultations are bookable through the Upwork website at

https://www.upwork.com/o/profiles/users/_~012a944372608823b2/.

Our support for those who believe they may have suffered from misconduct during litigation in the United States is no longer limited to scientific researchers.